Cruising the Icelandic Countryside: Check out our Iceland Jet Lag Journal
What you learn in the woods for 4 days with no phone and a bunch of creatives
Chicks in the Sticks Getaway in Greenport, NY

5 For Friday

678096bf220e39a4c25806cb0484c818

Pink! The color for Spring fashion, and a color that has me yearning for Spring weather. I booked a long weekend to Florida with one of my best gal pals next month, and I’m hoping that the weather down there is down right steamy.  Continue Reading

In Other Words

IMG_1890

There are some authors I biased toward, it’s true. And Jhumpa Lahiri definitely falls into that category, so with her new book, In Other Words, I pre-ordered my copy last month as soon as I heard it was coming out, and knew before it even made its way into my hands, I was going to be fond of this one.  Continue Reading

New York City Ballet: The Most Incredible Thing

Ah, the New York City Ballet Art Series. I mean. In life, there’s Christmas, and then there’s Villanova basketball, and then there’s the New York City Ballet Art Series. Good grief, it never disappoints. This year’s featured artist is Marcel Dzama, an illustrator/film producer/costume designer/sculptor/watercolorist/renaissance man. He created the costumes for the premiere of Justin Peck’s newest ballet, The Most Incredible Thing, with music by Bryce Dessner of The National. In addition, he filled the lobby theater with enormous movie screens featuring Amy Sedaris dancing freakishly with a painted eyeball on her forehead.

Continue Reading

Hiroshi Sugimoto’s Sea of Buddha

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I can’t recall the first time I saw Hiroshi Sugimoto. It was possibly at the Hirshhorn in Washington, DC in 2006 when he took life-size portraits of wax figures of the Tudors. What I really love is his overexposed Theaters series, but I can’t even remember if I’ve seen them in person, or if I’ve read my coffee table book so many times that I feel like I have. One time while in line at the Guggenheim gift shop, I overheard a woman with long gray waves talking about how she had the opportunity to buy a Hiroshi Sugimoto Seascape for $5,000 when she was in her 20s. But then, $5,000 was far too expensive because she was a struggling artist. I don’t know if she’s still struggling, or still an artist, but she can definitely afford that Seascape now and has regretted her art purchasing decision, or lack thereof, for years.

Continue Reading

5 For Friday

perfect summer dress

OMG, is it really, truly Friday? I thought the day would never arrive this week, but have never been more grateful for it (except for also last Friday, and possibly the before that too. . .) because weeks have been flying by very crazy at work. Continue Reading

The High Line Hotel’s Tiny Attic Jewelbox

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Way up on the top floor of the High Line Hotel, overlooking the snowy courtyard, is a tiny corner jewelbox of a room. With two dormer windows, a worn and colorful oriental rug, graphic blue wallpaper, and cup full of sharpened pencils (my favorite!), the room was such a cozy getaway. The High Line Hotel is two blocks away from my apartment, and I spend every Saturday morning here with a cup of Intelligentsia coffee and little sketching journal. When I saw a 20% off sale on Tablet, I booked months and months in advance. I love having something sweet to look forward to in the middle of winter.

Continue Reading

Paintbrush Portraits by Rebecca Szeto

Reflections on Beauty

Rebecca Szeto is an artist with a love for art history and for the humble, dirty old paintbrush on its last leg. With her paintbrush portraits, she is referring to the history of painting by using its own tool. She whittles the handle of the brush in order to make a canvas. By whittling, she is “reducing the brush to its core value or essence.” In this series of ladylike portraits, she celebrates lost, obscure women across history and geography.

Continue Reading

Italian Ways

images

I have a newly determined reading goal for the year, so I can greatly increase my book intake in a calendar year. And I’ve started off with January on track. So let’s discuss my first read of the year. . . Continue Reading

Tête-à-Tête with Amber Seagraves: Owner and Creator of Lasso Abode

LA 2

Amber Seagraves is the creator and designer of the accessories brand Lasso Abode. Handmade in Los Angeles, it’s a collection of beautifully bohemian fringed pillows and bags inspired by what Amber calls “Nordic Western” style. I met Amber at a business conferences for marketers and creatives, Unique CAMP. Her story is fantastic: it’s a cross-country journey with well-established brands at her back and her own entrepreneurial adventures ahead. Amber was incredibly kind to take time to share her story and offer up her expertise with All + Sundry. Please enjoy and sign up for Lasso Abode’s newsletter to see the new products that pop up and the occasional sale codes!

Continue Reading

Mastering the Art of Soviet Cooking: A Memoir of Food and Longing

Mastering the Art of Soviet Cooking

Anya Von Bremzen is a very well-published food writer, a regular contributor to Travel + Leisure, and author of the cookbook Please to Table. Mastering the Art of Soviet Cooking is not a cookbook – it is an evocative memoir of growing up in Soviet Russia. She also discusses her frustrations and her fascinations with the brightly colored boxes of American food, paralyzed by the multiplicity of choices after emigrating to the United States. I was drawn to this book for the love of food writing, and of course by the playful cover illustration that captured my fancy.

The food is Soviet Russia was affected very much by who was in power at the time, so Anya’s memoir runs in order of Lenin (during the Russian famine), Stalin (in which locals spent hours in food lines for soured vegetables), and then Kruschev (so much corn, wayyyyy too much corn and too little of everything else).

Continue Reading

Elizabeth’s Instagram
Kyra’s Instagram
A+S Archive
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad